Hummingbirds for Granny

Hummingbirds bring comfort and peace when they return each summer to let us know all is right with the world. They’ve come home. Photograph: J Gerald Crawford

In these special, endearing, final moments, hummingbirds are there to comfort, there to care for Granny, as she always cared for them.

Hummingbirds.

There for Granny.

Doubly there for Granny.

In these moments.

These special moments.

These special, endearing, final moments.

Hummingbirds to comfort.

Bring solace.

There to care, as she always cared for them.

There to supplant the tears.

Bring smiles.

Bright, reassuring smiles.

For Granny.

For those, too, there round-the-clock for weeks and weeks and weeks at the bedside:

Granny’s children.

Grandchildren.

Others.

And the family pets.

Mustn’t forget the family pets.

Those there with her in her final moments know the story.

Her home feeder was always filled for the Hummingbirds. She enjoyed them when she went to the mountains. Gifts given her often had a Hummingbird theme.

She loved them.

They loved her.

Flocked to her.

And she to them.

So, now, with nothing special there to attract them – no flowers, no feeders –they appear in these final moments.

Appear outside her window.

Just suddenly there.

As time draws near.

Sometimes hovering.

Sometimes darting.

Darting here.

Darting there.

To the window.

Away from the window.

Back to the window.

As if trying to peer inside.

As if they know.

As surely they do.

There, seemingly to say to Granny and the others there, no, no, no, this is not the end, this is the beginning.

The joyful beginning.

There, as if ready to escort her.

Escort her – lovingly escort her – to what is next.

There to comfort, ease the way.

How appropriate.

Hummingbirds.

Two Hummingbirds.

No feeder?

No flowers?

Nothing else accounts for their being there.

Nothing obvious to attract them.

Hummingbirds.

There.

Doubly there for Granny

And those there with her.

And we know why.

And we know why.

Now others do, too.

Blessings abound.

Roger Summers is a journalist, essayist, and lives sometimes in Texas and sometimes in New Mexico. He is the author of Word Songs From A Washboard Road. Please click HERE to find the short story collection on Amazon.

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  • Linda Pirtle

    Roger,
    What a beautiful tribute to hummingbirds and Granny! FYI: Caleb and I always look forward to the return of the hummingbirds each year and wish them well when they head south for the winter.

    • Roger Summers

      Thank you, Linda.

  • Carol Toberny

    Really beautiful and touching story. Well told and well illustrated.

    • Caleb Pirtle

      Both story and photograph touch the heart, Carol.

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