A Memoir: The Greek Civil War as Seen Through the Eyes of a Child

Dandelions for Dinner

What happens to a family already on the brink of disaster when the world around them crumbles? Dandelions for Dinner presents a memoir set in the sleepy town of Gargaliani, Greece, spanning the last quarter of the nineteenth century through the Greek Civil War of the 1940s. Told through the eyes of a thirteen- year- old boy, it is an epic tale of youth, family, poverty, war, and unjust loss. It is also an uplifting story of how in the midst of calamity, survival is possible by using your head, taking your hits, and maintaining an undying faith.

Though it is the tale of a family that is by all standards poor, Dandelions for Dinner demonstrates just how rich the poor can be when they have hope, faith, and love for one another-when they maintain the lessons of their parents and forefathers, nurture a love of education, and never let up on their hope for freedom. This memoir is, above all, a story about the importance of America-not only for those who live there, but also for all those who reside in the dark corners of faraway lands and dream of a better life. Over the course of their life together, any family will most assuredly experience both want and plenty, suffering and joy. Dandelions for Dinner is the surprising story of what remains when everything else is lost.

Sam, left, and Peter
Sam, left, and Peter Stamatis

About the Authors:

Sam Stamatis was born in Gargaliani, Greece. He immigrated to the United States at age thirteen and later served in the US Army. After a long career as an electrical engineer, Sam retired. He lives in Chicago’s northern suburbs with Litsa, his wife of more than fifty years.

Peter Stamatis is the youngest of Sam’s three children. He currently is a Chicago trial lawyer. Peter is the principal attorney at Law Offices of Peter S. Stamatis in Chicago.

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  • Caleb Pirtle

    It must have been a harrowing experience for Sam and Peter, and they have the premise for a really fine book. It is definitely one that can mix the drama of fiction into the reality of nonfiction.

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