Authors Showcase features the novels of Holly Robinson and Maria Granovsky

The Book: Sleeping Tigers

The Author: Holly Robinson

51mu0npt-1L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-63,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_The Story: Jordan O’Malley has everything she ever wanted: a job she loves, a beautiful home, and a dependable boyfriend. When her life unravels after a breast cancer scare, Jordan decides to join her wildest childhood friend in San Francisco and track down her drifter brother, Cam, who harbors secrets of his own.  When Cam suddenly flees the country, Jordan follows, determined to bring him home.

Her journey takes her to the farthest reaches of majestic Nepal, where she encounters tests–and truths–about love and family that she never could have imagined. Funny, heartbreaking, and suspenseful, Sleeping Tigers reminds us all that sometimes it’s better to follow your heart instead of a plan.

Best Indie Books of 2012 Semifinalist, Kindle Book Review
2011 Book of the Year Fiction Finalist, ForeWord Reviews

About the Author: Says Holly Robinson: I never meant to be a writer. I studied biology in college because I wanted to be a doctor – preferably one of those doctors who’s always jetting off to villages in Africa to save thousands of lives in a single weekend. But life intervened during my last semester of college, when I chose a class in creative writing.

From the moment I sat down to write, I became completely absorbed in my work. While I was writing, seven hours could pass like seven minutes. To the horror of my parents, I abandoned the idea of medical school to become a writer, promising that, if I didn’t get to be rich or famous in, oh, a year or so, I’d let common sense rule and find a real career.

Of course, none of that happened. A year went by. Two. Then more. As I became even more engrossed in the writing process, I did what all writers do to support my secret habit: I worked a thousand odd jobs, from proofreading telephone books (really) to construction. I kept writing, filling up the corners of my life and lots of paper with words.

Then one day, as I was driving home from the grocery store, a title floated across the windshield of my car: The Gerbil Farmer’s Daughter. After I finished laughing, my mouth went dry. I knew I had the title of my first book, which sets out to answer this question: How did my father, a career Navy man, end up on a farm with 9,000 gerbils?

The Book: Poison Pill

The Author: M. A. Granovsky

419dNGgQ4-L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-52,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_-1The Story: It’s the drug of the century, a miracle weight loss compound worth billions, invented by Jon Vickers shortly before his death. So why is Jon’s brother Benedict risking his inheritance, his brother’s legacy, and even his own life to keep the drug from the market?

And why is Olga Mueller, a jaded lawyer Benedict met by chance while traveling to Istanbul, willing to help?

Can they take on a powerful venture capitalist and a ruthless top-tier law firm and win? Or even survive? In a world where money rules, does truth stand a chance?

A terrific and fun legal thriller by a sure-handed writer.  I enjoyed it immensely.” Brian Haig, N.Y. Times Bestselling author of The Capitol Game.

About the Author: M. A. Granovsky uses her background as a cancer biologist and lawyer, and her international travels, to craft fast-paced, intricately plotted capers, where the protagonists rely on their wits rather than their brawn, and the body count rises only as much as is necessary. M. A.’s writing is influenced by her life-long passion for observing and understanding human behavior, and provides a window into the worlds of scientists, attorneys, and financiers, the passions and fears that motivate them, and the unintended consequences of untempered competition.

She currently lives in New York City, but has lived in many other places, from the exotic (Wilmington, Delaware), to the normal (St. Petersburg, Jerusalem), to the entertaining (Florence — in a convent). While it’s difficult to be the new kid on the block repeatedly, this nomadic existence – in terms of geography and career – continues to yield a rich vein of thriller plots.

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