What did the mysterious lady see in her astral visions?

As she saw the visions, her writing pen wrote furiously about what all she was seeing and she later published the results in Isis Unveiled.

A destitute but charismatic and mysterious woman arrived on the shores of New York in 1873. It was believed that she had arrived there, almost by circumnavigation, leaving a wake of bigamous marriages behind her. Whatever the truth, this Russian woman—one that could produce hypnotic stares that would rival those of Rasputin—claimed to be a spiritualist of the highest order.

As she settled in, she began attending some local spiritualist meetings, and through one of these, Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky had a meeting with Colonel Henry Olcott—it was fate. Olcott was a lawyer and journalist that had been delving deeply into spiritualism.

He was bowled over by the clairvoyant talents of Madam Blavatsky. He was so bowled over that in 1875 he was willing to provide financial backing for her dream project—the Theosophical Society. Madam Blavatsky was so impressed by the wisdom of the ancients, that she made sure that membership in her Theosophical Society contained plenty of Egyptologists, archaeologists, and scholars in antiquities.

Madame Helena Blavatsky

She wanted the group to have many “learned occultists.” She and Olcott had chosen the name of their group from the Greek word, theosophy, a combination of god and wisdom.

The Theosophical Society got off to a slow start, but in 1877, Madam Blavatsky began to have astral visions. As she saw the visions, her writing pen wrote furiously about what all she was seeing and she later published the results in Isis Unveiled. Olcott would be the first to admit that her trances were spooky, indeed.

The gist of what Madame Blavatsky was learning from her astral voyages and trances, was that human beings each exist on many planes—not just the physical one. In fact there is a ghostly double of each person that can travel great distances outside the physical body and can travel through time and space.

In addition, those who have trained themselves to expert levels in the astral arts can see the astral bodies of others in broad daylight. They appear as halos around each body and the colors of the aura vary depending on the personality to which they belong.

The publication of her theories and astral experiences caused the Theosophical movement to gain some steam. It also gained some new criticism and Madame Blavatsky talked Olcott into taking the movement to India where they would not be known. It was a smart move and many famous Indian mystics and even British colonials jumped into the movement. In 1884 Olcott and Blavatsky decided to try to get the endorsement of the Society for Psychical Research.

The SPR decided to send an investigator to India to make some investigations. The investigator, Richard Hodgson made a devastating report, practically labeling the Madame a charlatan, as a knower and seer.

It was a hard blow for Madam Blavatsky, but she would not be deterred and spent her remaining years lecturing to her true believers—she still had, and has, plenty of them. Whether she was a fake or not, her beliefs dovetailed almost exactly with Out of Body Experiences others have reported.

The best book about Madame Blavatsky is a hardcover version, The Esoteric World of Madame Blavatsky: Insights into the Life of a Modern Sphinx, by Daniel Caldwell. There are several other good biographies, by Marion Meade, Sylvia Cranston, Gary Lachman, Arthur Lily and one by Henry Steele Olcott, himself. If you wish to read what the mysterious Madame saw in her astral visions you can read those actual publications: Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine.

Sara Marie Hogg is the author of Curious Indeed, a collection of true stories about the unknown and unexplained. Click HERE to purchase a copy from Amazon.

, , , , , , , ,

Related Posts