A new year calls for a new publishing plan.

Lovely Night to Die is the first novella I have written, and it has been my biggest seller, thanks to the popularity of the Special Forces series of Kindle Wold’s books.

I think the three-in-one concept will be great for book signings, which is where I sell most of my paperback books anyway.

New year.

New plans.

It happens every time one yellowed and dog-eared calendar bites the dust, and another January suddenly appears out of the blue.

I have long written that today’s readers prefer shorter books.

At least they do with mystery/thrillers.

Or romance.

Forget the epics, the long-winded sagas.

Readers don’t want to make the journey anymore.

Time is precious to them.

Spend it on a lot of books instead of a few.

Those days of settling down and following a family through three generations and six-hundred pages have faded away with the passing years.

Now readers prefer bite-sized books.

Grab me quick.

Tell me a story.

Give me few characters.

Turn on a lot of emotion.

Show some suspense and surprises along the way.

Make me laugh a little.

Make me shed a tear or two.

Write The End as quickly as you can, and give me a chance to move on to another book.

You may be writing a saga.

You may be writing about the same family.

But tell me their story in three books instead of one.

In today’s hectic, chaotic, stress-filled world, readers no longer have the attention span they once did.

They want short.

Maybe even shorter.

So here is what I intend to do.

During 2018, I plan to write a time travel series built around the same character.

Each book will be a novella, somewhere between 100 to 120 pages.

I will place each on Amazon as a stand-alone eBook, and then I have decided to package all three novellas into one Trade Paperback book.

I think the three-in-one concept will be great for book signings, which is where I sell most of my paperback books anyway.

My idea is not original.

It’s not a breakthrough concept.

A lot of fine authors are already writing and producing several variations of the idea.

But I’ve never done it before, so I’m anxious to give it a whirl and see what the marketplace does with it.

The concept may work.

It may not.

It may hit a dead end and fall flat at my feet.

If so, there will always be another year.

I’ll simply take a deep breath, try to develop another plan, and write on. There is always another story to tell.

Books are like life.

We have a lot of stops, stutters, and starts, and we usually get lost a few times from the opening chapter to the last.

Please click HERE to find Lovely Night to Die on Amazon.

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  • I am watching you blog about this idea with great interest, Caleb. I’ve often wondered if readers would stand for (and pay for) getting a story in pieces, especially when the pieces are complex, if they are written to be fractal: chapters are meant as complete stories, and even individual scenes are designed to give a sense of completion.

    It might give some of us epic writers (writers of epics, not claiming epic status as a writer!) a way into the short-form markets.

    After the pieces are finished and published, put them together into the doorstop volume. Hmmm.

    • Caleb Pirtle

      The beauty of the novella plan, Alicia, is you can write three stand-alone books or create an “epic” story by writing about three generations of the same family or writing three books as a mini-series – one leads the reader to the next. I only know that readers tell me they don’t want to be bogged down in long-winded stories any more. That’s a shame. But it’s also a reality. I’m gonna plunge into a new trend and see if I drown.

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