Self-Published Authors Dare to Take Risks.

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I saw an interesting business article not long ago called 9 Ways to make a Million and as I read it, I was struck by how much of the advice applies to indie authors and self-publishing.  I’ve been working at my craft for many, many years and at times I get discouraged that I don’t have the success of some others.  And there’s always more I should be doing:

  • writing faster and publishing more books
  • getting my existing books in more markets
  • pursuing other avenues to sell books
  • figuring out other ways to market my books online
  • and on and on

I’ll talk to friends of mine (who aren’t authors) about all this, and many will say but you do so much, and you work so hard at it, it will come.  I sometimes lose sight of what I have done, and that this whole journey is part of the process to get me where I want to be.  And that’s where the article has value for indie authors…

Renee Pawlish
Renee Pawlish

Indie Authors – Start With Nothing

Most of us indie authors don’t just have a gift for writing a bestseller on our first attempt.  We learn our craft, practice, get rejected and more before we hit it big (and many of us will never hit it big, it’s just the way it is).  But, as the article points out, adversity and competition breed great leaders, or in this case, great authors.

Indie Authors – Do What You Love And Hope The Market Is There

For me, writing is more than just a business, or a way to make money.  I love everything about writing and books.  I love plotting stories and creating characters.  I would never do this if it was just about money, because let’s face it, there are a lot easier ways to make money (I just want to someday make enough money that I don’t need a day job  ).  Indie authors also have to consider that the story they loved creating may not have a market.  That’s part of this journey as well.

Indie Authors – You Own It

The really cool thing about self-publishing is that we indie authors are in control.  We get final say over editing, covers, where we publish, how much we charge, and so much more.  But with this comes the need to be prudent with our budgets and our resources.  Most of us don’t have tons of money for advertising, publicists and so on.  We have to be creative in all areas of our publishing endeavors.

Indie Authors – Take Risks, Make Mistakes, Trust Your Gut

As the article states, wildly successful people take calculated risks.  Sometimes you’ll fall flat on your face, but to be successful, you’ll pick yourself up and keep going.  And you’ll learn from your mistakes.  Indie authors also learn to trust their instincts, and beyond that, we have another great resource – each other.  This is such a supportive community – tap into it.

Indie Authors – Hard Work And Sacrifice

This piece of advice has been around for centuries, and it applies to indie authors.  It takes a lot of work to write and publish.  I think we’re already seeing many indie authors leave the business because they thought they could just write a book and it would instantly be a bestseller.  What the successful indie authors know is that it take alot of hard work, and sacrifices in other areas of our lives, in order to write and sell books.

wpid-This-Doesnt-Happen-In-The-Movies-newIndie Authors – Make Your Own Luck

There’s been a lot written about manufacturing your own luck.  Yes, there is such a thing as luck, but putting yourself in situations where luck can occur is prudent.  Get out and meet people, talk about what you do, look for opportunity to connect with readers and other authors, and things will start happening.  For example, I started teaching a class on self-publishing at a community college and it’s led me to wonderful new opportunities, some of which may help propel me into a household name.  If that happens, it will be because of luck and my putting myself out there…

Indie Authors – Diversify

At this point, if you’re staying exclusive to Amazon, you’re probably making a mistake.  And if you’re only selling ebooks, you’re probably making a mistake.  Look to diversify into paperbacks, audiobooks, boxed sets, serials, collaborations and more.  Get your books out in as many markets as you can.

What do you think it takes to make it in publishing?

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Please click the book cover image to read more about Renee Pawlish and her novels.

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  • Caleb Pirtle

    Writing is not a hobby. It’s not a pastime. It’s a business. A writer is nothing more than a small businessman who had production, marketing, advertising, and sales costs. And those in the business world face risks and critical decisions every day. If writers don’t want to play by those rules, they better do something else.

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