Why would you want a book deal in New York anyway?

Publishing contract

I READ A BLOG the other day by Business Ghost, who happens to be a successful ghost writer.

Stephen Woodfin sent it over to me, and it was worth reading.

The whole thing began when a blogger in the Huffington Post suggested that there are five reasons to get a deal with a New York Publisher.

Business Ghost has played the game and took them apart one by one.

You call this a Partnership between author and publisher?

The publisher receives eighty-five to ninety percent of the financial pie.

Sure the publisher has an editor look over the book, but from what we’ve been told by a New York literary agent, New York publishers are firing their good editors.

Been around too long.

Too expensive.

They hire kids.

Indies can do the same.

Besides, publishers don’t do any marketing or promotion for you, and they take a year to actually get the book out after it is completed and ready to go.

Forget the partnership.

It doesn’t exist.

You call this quality?

New York publishers don’t care anything about the contents of a book?

Is it good?

Is it bad?

What’s the marketing plan?

That’s all publishers care about.

How large a national footprint does the author have?

How big a social media following does he or she have?

As Business Ghost said: “The New York publishers are essentially running a scam on readers by publishing third-rate books with first-rate media platforms.”

Book readers have been forgotten.

Book readers don’t count anymore.

They still believe book readers will buy any garbage they sling their way.

You call this legitimacy?

Everyone wants a big-time publisher to reach into a morass of manuscripts, choose their books, and hold them up for the world to see.

This book must be good.

That’s the good.

This book must be good because New York Publisher put his imprint on it.

That’s not legitimacy.

That’s an ego trip.

Give your friends a test.

On a piece of paper write down the names of five major publishers.

Then make up five high-sounding names.

See if your friends know which names belong to real publishers and which ones are phony.

Readers don’t care.

Readers don’t bother with the names of publishers anyway.

Want distribution?

Forget New York.

Go to Amazon.

Bookstores pick and choose among the millions of titles that come their way in catalogs, and if your book is selected then hasn’t sold in a few weeks, they send the unsold copies back, and the publisher dumps them.

Amazon sells every book in the world.

It sells every book in the world almost every day.

Your book not selling?

Don’t worry.

Amazon keeps it out there for somebody to see.

Amazon keeps it out there for everybody to see.

You may remove it.

Amazon won’t.

Business Ghost said, “If you link your Website or social media to your book’s Amazon page, you will have better distribution than any author in the history of mankind.”

How about advances?

A few big name authors do receive them.

Nobody else.

So don’t expect big paydays from big advances.

They aren’t coming.

Even celebrities are fortunate to receive a $5,000 advance.

Usually, they receive the same advance you will receive.

So there it is.

Huffington Post says there are five reasons to strike a deal with a New York Publisher.

Business Ghost looked the blog over and came up with a different number of reasons to link to life and your book to New York.

Take it or leave it.

He said it was zero.

Please click the book cover image to read more about Golgotha Connection. It’s linked to Amazon, which is the world’s largest distributor of books.

Golgotha-New-2

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • Caleb Pirtle

    The big book deals in New York only benefitted the very few even during the glory days of publishing. Some authors caught fire, but most didn’t, and nobody ever knew when or if lightning would strike again.

    • Chapter 15, Life on the MIssissippi, Mark Twain. Riverboat pilots monopoly. Substitute ‘publisher’ for ‘pilot’ and make the small changes necessary to switch the concepts, and Mark Twain is far funnier than I could ever be.

    • Darlene Jones

      And we’ll never know how many authors sat in the slush pile back then. PS

      • Caleb Pirtle

        You would be shocked, I’m sure.

  • jack43

    As I see it, readers are attracted to authors. Books by a popular author will sell well. Also, books attributed to the famous and the infamous have a great potential for selling well (unless you’re infamous for pissing off the population – think Hillary Clinton; stacks of her latest tome are easy to find cluttering book store shelves and discount racks).The rest of us (and that’s a lot of US) struggle to even be noticed in the forest of titles. However, there is a way. Celebrities like Oprah Winfrey have sold a lot of books that they didn’t write or publish, and I bet they made a lot of money doing it. The challenge is to find a celebrity whose credentials would count for something among potential readers and induce them to recommend your book. (Just thinking out loud here…)

    • Darlene Jones

      So, let’s find that celebrity!

      • Caleb Pirtle

        No, Darlene, let’s make sure you and Jack become that kind of celebrity.

  • Don Newbury

    NYC publishers believe strongly in freedom of the press–as long as its their press.

    • Caleb Pirtle

      Don, that’s what I wish I had said.

Related Posts